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Author Topic: Rural 'ghost towns' warning ...  (Read 1035 times)

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Offline Jean

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Rural 'ghost towns' warning ...
« on: Sunday 11 March 2012, 1556 »

Offline Che Guevaras Flip Flops

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Re: Rural 'ghost towns' warning ...
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 11 March 2012, 1627 »
... by MPs Glyn Davies and Albert Owen

They miss the point entirely.  It's not the pulling out of businesses that creates the ghost villages,  it's the other way round.   The main reason for the decline of rural communities is lack of for-rent social housing - not just for families but couples and singles as well.   Mix that with the continuing purchase of existing houses as holiday homes/weekend retreats by outsiders and you quickly reach a point where there are not enough permanent residents to justify a decent bus service, a village primary school or generate sufficient custom to support village shops.

If the politicians really wanted these communities to survive they would be campaigning for the building of estates of council/housing assosciation accommodation for rent,  only available to people who have lived in the local authority area for at least 5 years, exempted fronm the 'Right-To-Buy' scheme.   They simply haven't the guts to even suggest it.  So the villages will continue to die because that is the only way to save them,  no politician will do it, therefore the politicians want the communites to die.

Offline justme

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Re: Rural 'ghost towns' warning ...
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 11 March 2012, 2357 »
I was watching postcode lottery on BBC the other morning, HSBC sre shutting their bank in a village (I can't remember the name) the BBC wanted to know why, and were told not enough customers go through the doors to justify it staying open. The BBC secretly filmed people going in the bank, they had a total of 98 in 1hr!! that is a lot of customers. When that bank closes the nearest one then is 10 miles away, and apparantly the bus service is rubbish.

Offline Che Guevaras Flip Flops

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Re: Rural 'ghost towns' warning ...
« Reply #3 on: Monday 12 March 2012, 0941 »
I was watching postcode lottery on BBC the other morning, HSBC sre shutting their bank in a village (I can't remember the name) the BBC wanted to know why, and were told not enough customers go through the doors to justify it staying open. The BBC secretly filmed people going in the bank, they had a total of 98 in 1hr!! that is a lot of customers. When that bank closes the nearest one then is 10 miles away, and apparantly the bus service is rubbish.

Depends what the customers were doing.  Most of the transactions customers carry out in a bank generate very little income for the bank itself.  98 may sound a lot but if they generated say 1 actual bank income per customer (some will have generated more, some won't have generated any),  that would probably not cover the cost of running the bank for an hour.

Bottom line is banks are businesses and local banks are extremly costly to run when you consider not just the usual culprits - wages, business rate, water, electric, cost of having large quanities of cash delivered and collected etc etc but also the actual insurance on a bank must be pretty hefty.   They are in business to make money by providing a profitable service - not just a service.  Their main concern is their shareholders not their customers.   There is a socialised banking system - the Post Office, but even they are now under orders to at least break-even or they will be closed.
« Last Edit: Monday 12 March 2012, 0957 by Che Guevaras Flip Flops »

Offline Nooks

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Re: Rural 'ghost towns' warning ...
« Reply #4 on: Monday 12 March 2012, 1207 »
I wouldn't read anything into the HSBC Bank Closing. Ever since they changed from the Midland Bank, the HSBC has continually run down their counter services in favour of automated processes. Our local Midland Bank used to have a main town centre branch with 10 counters and two sub branches. Now they have no subs, and only 2 counters plus a range of automated machines. They have a small selection of staff, none of which are allowed to make any decisions without consulting external managers. My late father worked for the Midland bank for over 40 years, and, prior to his death, was arranging to open accounts at another bank. I have now done the same (moved accounts, not died) because I want a bank that provides some real service.

Holyhead is definately not a ghost town, it's just that the centre of trading has moved. Without having any actual statistics to qoute, I would be very surprised if the GDP for the Holyhead area was not substantially larger than that of 20 years ago.
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Offline Che Guevaras Flip Flops

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Re: Rural 'ghost towns' warning ...
« Reply #5 on: Monday 12 March 2012, 1229 »
I wouldn't read anything into the HSBC Bank Closing. Ever since they changed from the Midland Bank, the HSBC has continually run down their counter services in favour of automated processes. Our local Midland Bank used to have a main town centre branch with 10 counters and two sub branches. Now they have no subs, and only 2 counters plus a range of automated machines. They have a small selection of staff, none of which are allowed to make any decisions without consulting external managers. My late father worked for the Midland bank for over 40 years, and, prior to his death, was arranging to open accounts at another bank. I have now done the same (moved accounts, not died) because I want a bank that provides some real service.

Holyhead is definately not a ghost town, it's just that the centre of trading has moved. Without having any actual statistics to qoute, I would be very surprised if the GDP for the Holyhead area was not substantially larger than that of 20 years ago.


This thread is about the isolated rural villages that are becoming 'ghost villages' though,  not about bigger towns such as Holyhead.    Anyways being as you've expanded and brought Holyhead up,  GDP is not as accurate a measurement of disposable relative wealth as is GVA - and Anglesey's GVA is dire at only marginally over half of the UK average, second from bottom, and the gap between average and Anglesey continuing to increase.

Offline The Prying I

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Re: Rural 'ghost towns' warning ...
« Reply #6 on: Thursday 15 March 2012, 1037 »
Anglesey is undeveloped in all sectors especially tourism.

Beside the lovely scenery and beaches we have nothing other than a half completed castle; Pilla Palas and the Sea Zoo to keep hundreds of thousands of tourists and their kids happy.

Water and amusement parks would attract the tourists and if situated in central Anglesey would help breathe life back in to some of the ghost villages.  They could reopen the railway line from Gaerwen to Amlwch and operate a steam loco during the holiday season.  I also think a cable car ride over Paris mountain would be a money spinner. 


Hooray for Holyhead.

Offline Carnedyr

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Re: Rural 'ghost towns' warning ...
« Reply #7 on: Thursday 15 March 2012, 1812 »
Anglesey is undeveloped in all sectors especially tourism.

Beside the lovely scenery and beaches we have nothing other than a half completed castle; Pilla Palas and the Sea Zoo to keep hundreds of thousands of tourists and their kids happy.

Water and amusement parks would attract the tourists and if situated in central Anglesey would help breathe life back in to some of the ghost villages.  They could reopen the railway line from Gaerwen to Amlwch and operate a steam loco during the holiday season.  I also think a cable car ride over Paris mountain would be a money spinner.

Oh how terrible, also all these people in small villages around Anglesey speak Welsh which could be very hard for tourists to understand. I think we should promote being a happy holiday hotspot and put cable cars across the island.
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